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huffing for life

viral disrupter in bag, breaths from bag, feel better in isolation. Possibly kill virus
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I was trying to do a 3D print, the cleaning chemicals, well, are quite volatile and I had the thought, Just how delicate is a virus?. Possibly, there are chemicals that rupture the virus lipid bi-layer by getting past those glycoprotein protrusions via a gaseous form.

This could be a clever choice of huffing chemicals but realize they can cross the blood-brain barrier with long term use. Huffing is breathing in a overpowering concentration of a volatile, usually a light polar molecule, to get high. These chemicals, with the short term use, are mildly negative but may also carry the ability that can destroy viruses.

By destroy, I mean rupture which allows the personal immune response to form antibodies on the scattered parts.

And with the right chemical, the 14 days will float by.

wjt, Mar 19 2020

Sauna for health https://www.youtube...watch?v=KoheVioD3Bg
Dig the soundtrack, too [Chairborne Hero, Mar 20 2020]

Aerosol and Surface Stability of SARS-CoV-2 as Compared with SARS-CoV-1 https://www.nejm.or...0.1056/NEJMc2004973
MIMA: Scientific letter [notexactly, Mar 20 2020]

CBC News: Coronavirus can persist on surfaces for days, new study says https://www.cbc.ca/...ace-study-1.5501296
MIMA: News article based on above study [notexactly, Mar 20 2020]

Temp, humidity, and Covid-19 https://papers.ssrn...abstract_id=3550308
If this theory is proven true... [4and20, Mar 20 2020]

[link]






       Hasn't this been looked into? If not it should be.   

       Bun for being a fellow 3d printer too.
doctorremulac3, Mar 20 2020
  

       Yes 3d printers rock. Built mine with a Makers group from a kit.   

       What chemicals did you have in mind for rupturing viruses?   

       I spy with my little electron microscope something ending with - ase.
pertinax, Mar 20 2020
  

       I would have thought -ases are too heavy so was thinking lowly ethanol depending on it's llpid cutting abilities. Miscible acetone is a step up and then there are the non polar solvents like toluene, butane but exposure should be limited.   

       Anything that will damage the virus for the immune system, are not overall to damaging and have a slight euphoric lift.
wjt, Mar 20 2020
  

       You may be huffing something good. Since I've read that humidity reduces some coronaviruses (and aircon doesn't) I've been taking 45 minute steaming showers. There must be some reason people also take saunas, other than to see naked Finnish women.
4and20, Mar 20 2020
  

       //Since I've read that humidity reduces some coronaviruses//   

       I've heard that covid19 won't enter the body of anyone wearing glam rock clothes.
bigsleep, Mar 20 2020
  

       Yes I read that as well!   

       (I read it right here)
pocmloc, Mar 20 2020
  

       Chlorine Trifluoride will kill coronavirus.
8th of 7, Mar 20 2020
  

       If ethanol would do it, wouldn't getting drunk be easier?   

       // I've read that humidity reduces some coronaviruses //   

       Have you read that from recent sources (within the past 2 years)? It seems like that used to be the thinking (counterintuitively, based on the humidity getting in the way of airborne pathogens, I think?), but there was a study a couple of years ago that, IIRC, found that flu viruses were unaffected by humidity in more realistic conditions. So I'm not sure.   

       What I read just last night was that a new study [link] (just published the other day) found that SARS-CoV-2 is not carried in aerosols. The news article I read [link] that was based on it said that the virus is carried in large droplets from sneezing and coughing, and those large droplets quickly (how quickly?) fall to the ground within 2 meters of release, but didn't cite a source for those claims.
notexactly, Mar 20 2020
  

       Am linking to the humidity related paper. I've been reading the opposite about Covid-19 in recent days, with suggestions that a cough or sneeze can remain suspended in air for 2 hours.   

       Edit: the paper you linked said 3 hours
4and20, Mar 20 2020
  
      
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