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oldfogiesjobs.com

After 40 your doomed in the tech industry, unless
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... unless you put your 5 page resume with everything you did on the site. It cuts the resume up into various fields of expertise.

Why shouldn't you have at least the same chance as those students that know nothing but think they understand everything just because they got a good mark on the test.

Everybody knows your passed 40, so you've been places. They know your rusty. But they want to hire you.

Find out what the prices are for your type of employment. Get encouraged by friends who were out of work for long periods and found a new way to go.

Time is money, and you got a lot of time!

pashute, May 26 2011

Monster.com: Discrimination in Job Adverts http://hiring.monst...in-job-adverts.aspx
"Avoiding Age Discrimination - The rules now not only cover stipulating upper or lower age limits for job applicants, but also implied terms such as ‘youthful', ‘dynamic' or ‘mature'. All these terms could be seen as excluding someone from applying for a role based on their age." While there are probably no hard and fast rules governing what is discriminatory and what is not - language such as "oldfogiesjobs.com", or stating a specific age range (or indirectly, asking for a specific number of years experience that might exclude a younger candidate) are probably riskier in terms of (UK) legislation. [zen_tom, May 27 2011]

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       OK, I'm pumped! I'm getting right on this after my nap... [+]
Grogster, May 27 2011
  

       pedant alert: They know my passed 40 what? They know my rusty what? sp: //Everybody knows your// you're.
RayfordSteele, May 27 2011
  

       Bah - pish and nonsense. (In the nicest possible way)   

       I definitely disagree with the premise that at age 40 you're out of date.   

       But, even accepting that, every company does/should employ an old rake - ideally one of those old crusty old types prone to occasional fits of laughter/rage that are best used to rub up against the new breed - not so much to impart any specific knowledge, but more to reign back their more exuberant urges. When the requirements come in and the youngsters are all jumping about going "yes!" - you need a gnarled old bastard to set his jaw and promote caution.   

       Also, if you want your CV to have that extra pazzaz, try checking it for basic grammatical errors such as your, you're etc - it may not be a prerequisite for employment, but if you're looking for a role in an industry in which precision is important, it pays to present that image in your promotional material.   

       Finally, what exactly is it you are suggesting here that isn't already provided by niche agencies and websites that promote experts within particular fields?   

       Even more finally (and somewhat contradictorarily - yes, I know that's not a word) I've been told by HR that it's no longer appropriate for a job offer to explicitly ask for an "experienced" candidate, as it may be seen as being discriminatory on grounds of age. I don't particularly agree with that, but in an environment where awareness of, sensitivity to, and more specifically - legislation concerning, age-discrimination, is coming to the fore, is it a good idea to base a new website on the idea of promoting the opposite?
zen_tom, May 27 2011
  

       ['sleep] you're probably right - and I think they did stipulate that in certain cases, asking for a specific number of years' experience could be seen as sailing close to the wind - so I was probably being a little imprecise there to suggest that simply asking for "experienced" might be problematic. It's all a case of interpretation, but apparently other words have been singled out as being best avoided such as "dynamic", "youthful" or "mature" - as these may give the impression that a person's age is under consideration. I'd rather not have to think about it personally, but it really is quite a minefield!
zen_tom, May 27 2011
  
      
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