Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
h a l f b a k e r y
Like you could do any better.

idea: add, search, annotate, link, view, overview, recent, by name, random

meta: news, help, about, links, report a problem

account: browse anonymously, or get an account and write.

user:
pass:
register,


                             

Autism Goggles

  (+3, -1)
(+3, -1)
  [vote for,
against]

Autistic kids already use headphones and special chewing toys to shield them from excessive external stimuli.

I'm pretty sure that goggles that restrict peripheral vision would be equally calming. For demonstration take two empty toilet paper rolls and look through them. Depending where you are on the autism spectrum you may find the experience soothing.

ixnaum, Mar 27 2016

amazon view behind you glasses http://www.amazon.c...ision/dp/B000O1T52O
[beanangel, Mar 28 2016]

ADD blinders ADD_20Blinder
[JesusHChrist, Mar 28 2016]

[link]






       But it would be quite terrifying if you saw someone else's eyes at the other ends of the tubes.
MaxwellBuchanan, Mar 27 2016
  

       I didn't think of that. I wonder what would happen if two people wearing these goggles crossed gazes.
ixnaum, Mar 28 2016
  

       A good idea, but fully baked. Parents and caregivers have been using “side blinders” to keep autistic kids from stimming for decades.   

       Long tubes, though, I’ve never seen. Most blinders are or attach to glasses, restricting peripheral vision only.
CraigD, Mar 28 2016
  

       // I wonder what would happen if two people wearing these goggles crossed gazes. //   

       <Spengler>   

       "Don't cross the streams... "   

       </Spengler>
8th of 7, Mar 28 2016
  

       xkcd published a wide view goggle to view mountains thing. it is possible that what some say is "regular" human social behavior where people place their social interactees near center of vision would cause wide angle mirror tubes to be soothing as there is less centristic visual distraction socioactivity.   

       Amazon has view behind you glasses.
beanangel, Mar 28 2016
  

       We used this same thing to help us understand the diminished vision that Alzheimer's patients have. Very eye opening.
blissmiss, Mar 30 2016
  

       [Beany]????!!!!!!
MaxwellBuchanan, Mar 30 2016
  

       If this were a thing you could plug into a computer, would it be regarded as peripheral vision?
Ian Tindale, Mar 30 2016
  

       Wow, I didn't notice. There's been a [beany] sighting. Yay you.
blissmiss, Mar 31 2016
  

       // it is possible that what some say is "regular" human social behavior where people place their social interactees near center of vision would cause wide angle mirror tubes to be soothing as there is less centristic visual distraction socioactivity.//   

       Now I feel stupid :-( Would someone kindly break that down into sentences short enough for me to understand?
Voice, Apr 01 2016
  

       OK, my understanding of it, FWIW, goes like this:   

       1. Regarding conversation and eye-contact, normal ain't normal. A couple of examples -
(a) I've heard that, in some Australian aboriginal cultures (sorry, I don't have a source), the etiquette for conversation (between men, at least) is that, instead of looking at the person talking, you should look where he is looking.
(b) I've heard that one of the cultural differences that made life harder for West Indians coming the to UK in the sixties and seventies was that, in West Indian schools, pupils were told to look down (respectfully) when the teacher spoke to them, whereas, in UK schools, it's "look at me when I'm talking to you".
So, the assumption that keeping an interlocutor at the centre of your field of vision is "regular" is quite ... parochial, speaking geographically and historically. That's what I think [beany] means by //what some say is "regular"//.
  

       2. Given that an interlocutor *is* at the centre of the visual field (notwithstanding 1, above), diluting the personal interaction would help nerds (or, at least, I think this is [beany]'s hypothesis). Such dilution might be achieved by widening the effective aperture through which the world is viewed, instead of narrowing it.   

       I don't necessarily agree with this, but I think it is what [beany] meant.
pertinax, Apr 02 2016
  

       Interestingly, in current experiments I’m performing (well, not performing, it’s not a pantomime or something) I’m experimenting with how much of a viewport the person (allegedly) delivering the talking of a slab of education should occupy. In video, a lot of technique derives from television and film, whereby the central focus and subject is the one that is talking.   

       In animation, the lip-sync is one of the most expensive parts, as it is highly labour intensive and errors are highly apparent. As we got better in animation lip-sync the realism improved. However, the character doing the talking would be usually framed centrally or as one of a pair or more framed centrally, making them the primary subject in view when talking.   

       What I’m experimenting with is the ratio between visual educational information versus the human talking about it. The weather on telly puts the human off to one side, with the map being the main information. Going further, the deaf signing on telly puts a BSL signer off to one corner, usually DVE-ing the entire film or television presentation into a smaller box that the signer just about overlaps. The signer is quite small by comparison in such situations. I don’t think the presenter or ‘lecturer’ to one side really needs to be much bigger than that, and is by definition not as important as the information being talked about.
Ian Tindale, Apr 02 2016
  
      
[annotate]
  


 

back: main index

business  computer  culture  fashion  food  halfbakery  home  other  product  public  science  sport  vehicle