Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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Strap *this* to the back of your cat.

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Early Ordering

"I'll have the peking duck and the egg fried rice for my booking on Tuesday, please..."
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The problem with some restaurants is that the food is a tad on the slow side, especially when you're on a bad date and you want to get out there as fast as possible.

What I think should happen is that a person comes into the restaurant the week before, or goes onto a specific website (and uses an account), books a table and what they want to have for their meal on that day, pay by credit card, and leave/log out. If they don't come, the restaurant still gets paid, and if they do come, they get served a lot quicker.

froglet, Jun 04 2006

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       Good idea, but I think the inherent chaos of running a restaraunt on a nightly basis makes this idea not much more efficient than the regular way. Anyone?
epicproblem, Jun 04 2006
  

       I'm torn. This would be a good service for pre-theatre meals, when time is tight. On the other hand, if I'm just going out for a meal, I _like_ to be able to take my time. My experience is that places where the food arrives promptly are the places where the waiters are chivvying you out the door as soon as your dessert spoon hits the plate. I like to sit and digest and chat for a bit.   

       And how do you know it's going to be a disastrous date the week before?
moomintroll, Jun 04 2006
  

       Baked. Have you ever heard of something called "reservations"? They are quite common at several restaurants and work exactly the way you described.
Shadow Phoenix, Jan 02 2008
  
      
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