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Frozen Smoke Furniture

Incinerate furniture and freeze into the same forms
 
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Take wooden or MDF furniture (don't worry, I will deal with the formaldehyde issue). Encase it in metal, moulded closely to its form, with a small pipe leading out of one corner. Proceed to heat the metal to near melting point, thereby decomposing (not literally incinerating) the material from which the furniture is composed. Collect the fumes thus formed. Then reduce the temperature of the metal mould to well below the freezing point of the fumes concerned, pump them back into the void and freeze them. Remove the mould to reveal the same piece of furniture made of the same atoms but in frozen form, and store at around 70 K. This deals incidentally with the formaldehyde, which freezes at around 180 K. Don a protective suit of some kind and proceed to sit on your frozen gas chair at your frozen gas desk, lay a frozen gas dinner table around which frozen gas chairs have been arranged, or store your clothes in your frozen gas wardrobe.

A couple of issues occur. One involves contraction and expansion. Much of a wooden item of furniture, I imagine, would decompose into carbon dioxide and water vapour. The former would contract as its temperature was lowered but the latter would expand for a while before contracting again. The whole lot would, I imagine, contract considerably at such a low temperature and I'm not sure how large the resultant furniture would end up but if it was smaller, it would be easier to store or fit in. Another is the question of a eutectic mix leading to hard-to-predict condensation and freezing points.

nineteenthly, Feb 27 2017


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