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Granny, the prision lecturer

  (+24, -1)(+24, -1)(+24, -1)
(+24, -1)
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For any prison near a retirement home, hire a few old grandparents with a knack of lecturing whippersnappers for hours on end to deal with repeat offenders (people who keep ending up in prison for the wrong reason).

These prisoners will have a schedule time, (usually in the early early morning) where these gramps will tell them what they did wrong in their life, and how the prisoner had it easy compared to them, and etc... This will go on, regardless of if the prisoner wants to end the session or not.

Of course they can choose not to listen to the gramps, in which case they will get sent off to the isolation ward.

Hopefully, the idea is that when they are released, they cannot have a single thought involving crime without the nagging voice of these gramps hovering over their head.

mofosyne, Oct 09 2010

(Mis)prision http://www.lectlaw.com/def2/m034.htm
All it takes is a little back-formation. [mouseposture, Oct 09 2010]

[link]






       Paging Dr. Ludovico, Dr. Ludovico ....
mouseposture, Oct 09 2010
  

       prision really should be a word.
po, Oct 09 2010
  

       [po] It almost is <link>   

       "Silently to observe the commission of a felony, without using any endeavors to apprehend the offender, is a misprision." So, if a constable arrests a criminal in the act of committing a felony -- that's "prision." Or would be if English made any sense.
mouseposture, Oct 09 2010
  

       This stands a good chance of success. [+].
8th of 7, Oct 09 2010
  

       By "success" you mean "promoting serial murder of elderly pensioners?"
mouseposture, Oct 09 2010
  

       Well, yeah, there's that, [mouse]; but at least you know what will be tormenting (both of) them.   

       [Akimbo], I love this idea! Bun. [+]
Grogster, Oct 09 2010
  

       Granny what big lectures you have. (+)   

       "All the better to scold you with, my dear!"
Canuck, Oct 09 2010
  

       not sure this survives the cruel and unusual test
theircompetitor, Oct 09 2010
  

       Cruel, possibly, but certianly not unusual to anyone who has ever been lectured at length by an older relative or friend.
8th of 7, Oct 09 2010
  

       "No! Not Ludwig Van! No!, No!, Nooo-o-o-o..."   

       <edit>Ah, it's just dawned on me who Dr Ludovico was. Excellent, [mouseposture].
infidel, Oct 09 2010
  

       //the cruel and unusual test//   

       the thing about "cruel and unusual" is that the "unusual" part can be dealt with by doing it often enough. Many relationships exist on this basis.
MaxwellBuchanan, Oct 09 2010
  

       I had a similar idea, but only about sending them to schools rather than prisons.
RayfordSteele, Oct 10 2010
  

       // schools rather than prisons //   

       Remind us again what the difference is...
8th of 7, Oct 10 2010
  

       Prisoners usually finish their stay with some new skill/s, be they mechanics, literacy or safecracking. Schools appear to be unable to impart any skills to their charges.
infidel, Oct 10 2010
  

       <Hamlet>   

       A goodly one; in which there are many confines, wards and dungeons, Denmark being one o' the worst.   

       </Hamlet>   

       We too could be bounded in a nutshell and count ourselves the kings of infinite space.   

       It's the bad dreams that spoil it all ...
8th of 7, Oct 10 2010
  

       This is torture. Sheer torture. +
blissmiss, Oct 11 2010
  

       Where's [po]'s linky?
Dub, Oct 12 2010
  

       ^
po, Oct 12 2010
  
      
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