Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
h a l f b a k e r y
Tempus fudge-it.

idea: add, search, annotate, link, view, overview, recent, by name, random

meta: news, help, about, links, report a problem

account: browse anonymously, or get an account and write.

user:
pass:
register,


               

It's a Wrap

use the tube, or lose the tube
  (+6)
(+6)
  [vote for,
against]

apologies for the small scale of this one..

I've just finished wrapping some christmas presents ([jonthegeologist] and [hazel], fear not, it's safe for you to read on), and I'm left with a paltry cardboard tube which is too thin to be useful, but too thick for me to want to discard it without further thought.

I hearby propose that the tubes be made a bit thicker so they are in fact mailing tubes.. if it happens that you don't need one at the moment, you can either give it to a friend, or return it to the place your bought the paper from for a 25c deposit return.

P.S. obviously I'd rather social convention was that presents were dispatched au naturale, but I accept I'm at odds with the general populus on this one.
neilp, Dec 14 2004

Wandsworth's Work & Play - scrap project. http://www.london21...e%20and%20Recycling
recycle scrap paper, card, material etc for local groups and schools etc [po, Dec 14 2004]

Please log in.
If you're not logged in, you can see what this page looks like, but you will not be able to add anything.
Short name, e.g., Bob's Coffee
Destination URL. E.g., https://www.coffee.com/
Description (displayed with the short name and URL.)






       also works for aluminium foil and cling wrap stuff.
neilp, Dec 14 2004
  

       oh, good time to link to wandsworth's scrap project.
po, Dec 14 2004
  

       nice one [po], obviously that's the other option, I'd rather give them an actual first purpose before we trash them.
neilp, Dec 14 2004
  

       is there a minimum size limit on mailing tubes? i guess they have to be sturdy enough to withstand knocking about inside mail bags - but what would stop you from rolling up a letter and sticking it in a drinking straw and it arriving at its destination? the stamp i suppose.
benfrost, Dec 14 2004
  

       [benfrost] that sounds like an excellent experiment. The postal authorities are always keen for a challenge.
neilp, Dec 14 2004
  

       Great idea.   

       You could print on the tube places to stick the stamps -- write the address etc.   

       Even better .. pay an extra 80p when you buy the wrapping paper .. and in the middle of it you'll find a fully pre-paid cardboard tube waiting for use ... easy recycling ..
britboy, Dec 15 2004
  


 

back: main index

business  computer  culture  fashion  food  halfbakery  home  other  product  public  science  sport  vehicle