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Measuring Riduculosity

When you want to know how little sense you're making
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(+2, -6)
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I propose a measure of ridiculousness based on this algorithm:

Count the number of made up words, call it a.

Take the average stupidity of the impossible ideas presented, call that b.

Take the amount of funny/awesome presented, call that c.

Ridiculousness = b(a-c+1).

For instance, this idea would warrant the following: a = 5 b = 4 c = 0 riduculousness = 4(5-0+1) = 24.

Therefore, I score a 24 on the ridiculosity scale, which is an impossible idea, meaning I score 30, yet another impossible idea, 36, 42, 48...

themuffinking, Jan 14 2007

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       Ridiculous: adj. Deserving or inspiring ridicule; absurd, preposterous, or silly.   

       If you are using 'ridiculous' in the first sense, I don't think using made-up words is necessarily deserving of ridicule (Shakespeare's plays seem to be fairly well-regarded, for example). If you are using it in the second sense, I don't think funny ideas are less absurd or silly than serious ones.   

       And your last sentence makes no sense; why is scoring 24 an impossible idea? But, you do deserve some credit for coming up with a ridiculous definition of ridiculousness, you slithy tove.
imaginality, Jan 14 2007
  

       What is this idea's usefullness?
flynn, Jan 14 2007
  

       Don't you ever?   

       Isn't this notion already covered by the Absolute Drivel scale?
zen_tom, Jan 14 2007
  
      
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