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An immunization that makes people smarter

There are proteins that have to do with fatigue or sleepiness, immunizing against these to partially reduce them increases alertness and vigor
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I think there might be a bunch of sleepiness or cognition impairing proteins that naturally circulate at normal humans. immunizing against these could then be measured as to their effectiveness as nootropics (smart drugs) or fatigue reducing drugs.

Ten minutes of looking at Pubmed [links] suggest two antibodies that could reduce fatigue and amplify cognition in normal people. Antibodies to (Serum anti-aquaporin 4 (AQP4) antibody), also the FDA approved antibody drug Natalizumab are published as causing cognitive or energetic recovery in abnormal persons. I recently read that reducing kynurenic acid production, knocking out the production of kynurenine aminotransferase II causes nicotine acetylcholine receptors to be more active. So immunizing against the cytokines that produce kynurenic acid could cause cause greater intelligence. [link]

Noting that some FDA approved antibody drugs reduce beta amyloid plaques, (that is, they are active at the brain) if they could find any naturally occurring NGF (Nerve growth Factor) absorbing proteins, immunizing against those absorbers might cause greater NGF at the brain, increasing intelligence.

There might be dozens of normal proteins that slightly impair normal cognition, so finding out what these are then immunizing against them (possibly with an oral vaccine) would produce a smart drug effective at one dose, that might last a lifetime!

beanangel, Oct 18 2016

Natalizumab reduces fatigue https://www.ncbi.nl...gov/pubmed/23555589
[beanangel, Oct 18 2016]

anti-aquaporin 4 antibody is bad for memory, so immunize against it https://www.ncbi.nl...gov/pubmed/25142537
[beanangel, Oct 18 2016]

I wish I was taller http://dailycartoon...s-seinfeld-cartoon/
[theircompetitor, Oct 18 2016]

Reduction of endogenous kynurenic acid formation enhances extracellular glutamate, hippocampal plasticity, and cognitive behavior. https://www.ncbi.nl...gov/pubmed/20336058
[beanangel, Oct 27 2016]

[link]






       " I think there might be " and " ten minutes of looking at Pubmed ", followed by " there might be ".   

       Interesting category title - I'd love to know the stories behind some of these.
normzone, Oct 18 2016
  

       I think category health:brain could be beneficial.   

       the idea behind mentioning that a quick look at pubmed finds some of these chemicals is to suggest that the idea could also work on some of the many dozens of things likely findable at the literature. kind of ...halfbaked, as compared with finding say the three most likely chemicals after an exhaustive search.   

       Although not actually a nootropic, _partially_ immunizing against COX-2 could likely reduce fatigue, also, like aspirin, it might reduce the prevalence of some cancers. It might remove subacute fever befuddlement.
beanangel, Oct 18 2016
  

       I am at a loss for witty repartee but this idea makes me think: bread.
bungston, Oct 18 2016
  

       //_partially_ immunizing against COX-2 //   

       Partially immunizing isn't really a thing, unfortunately. And frankly I don't want any type of autoimmunity anywhere near me. Think lupus, think MS, think rheumatoid arthritis...
MaxwellBuchanan, Oct 18 2016
  

       As a norman huming bean, I"m pretty sure this idea gave me sub acute fever befuddlement.
normzone, Oct 18 2016
  

       The trouble is that if this worked it would instantly cripple huge chunks of the service economy, like gambling, reality TV production and the music industry, plus designer clothing, bottled water, and BMW.   

       Then again ...
8th of 7, Oct 18 2016
  

       [beany] when you perfect the formula we can fog the air with it. Preferably in Congress. [+]
whatrock, Oct 19 2016
  

       // Congress //   

       You'd need a mikvah for that, not a fogger ...
8th of 7, Oct 19 2016
  

       This might be alright if the protein's full actions and pathways are known.   

       8th of 7 will like this. Even then, wouldn't it be better to bring the protein into balance, like an envasive species, rather than losing it's diversity.
wjt, Oct 19 2016
  

       No, it wouldn't. Freedom is irrelevant, self-determination is irrelevant. You will be Assimilated. You must comply. Resistance is futile.
8th of 7, Oct 19 2016
  

       [8th of 7] What's it like to be meaningless other than to eat resources?
wjt, Oct 20 2016
  

       The data in that area are very limited, as horses either can't or won't articulate their perceptions of their life experience.
8th of 7, Oct 20 2016
  

       Might I suggest assimilating an experienced Equidae comparative psychologist.
wjt, Oct 21 2016
  

       You may suggest it, but there's no way we'd do it. The little we already know about horses emphatically convinces us that they are a total waste of oxygen.
8th of 7, Oct 21 2016
  

       I recently read that reducing kynurenic acid production, knocking out the production of kynurenine aminotransferase II causes nicotine acetylcholine receptors to be more active. So immunizing against the cytokines that produce kynurenic acid could cause cause greater intelligence. [link]
beanangel, Oct 27 2016
  

       // knocking out the production of kynurenine aminotransferase II causes nicotine acetylcholine receptors to be more active //   

       Just like organophosphate nerve agents, then. What could possibly go wrong ... ?
8th of 7, Oct 28 2016
  

       Other than the brain being an organic difference engine, it is also a balancing engine. Stick your oscillation substance in at your peril.   

       The first large oscillation is free, the rest costs dearly.
wjt, Oct 28 2016
  

       [8th of 7] actually, viewing the paper the KO mice had about 10 or 20% better abilities at cognitive tasks. there are many possibilities, among them that it has the nootropic effects of nicotine (or varenicline)without the tobacco.   

       a way to actually *guess* at what it might do is to find people with genetic variations, like SNPs, that naturally minimize the amount of kynurenine aminotransferase II then find out how they are different from the most similar humans.
beanangel, Oct 28 2016
  
      
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