Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
h a l f b a k e r y
RIFHMAO
(Rolling in flour, halfbaking my ass off)

idea: add, search, annotate, link, view, overview, recent, by name, random

meta: news, help, about, links, report a problem

account: browse anonymously, or get an account and write.

user:
pass:
register,


                     

Shiny Flavorsplash neolecithin

lecithin is a flavor emulsifier, just like fats have a sudden melting point a version of lecithin that abruptly melts at mouth temperature releases a sudden autowetness of flavor
  (+6)
(+6)
  [vote for,
against]

phosphatidylcholine, which is a beneficial chemical, is a variety of lecithin. lecithin is actually a name for a variety of combined emulsifying phospolipids. I think making just one particular phospholipid that has an sudden meltpoint the way white chocolate does would create a sudden flavor release when a food was warmed in the mouth.

basically people could blend this sudden meltpoint lecithin with sucralose then put it on the surface of candy to create candy that tasted like it was already suddenly moist, sweet, and melting regardless of the actual flavor. This is a huge improvement over "shiny wax" coatings as this is a "shiny flavorsplash!" coating

the reason white chocolate melts rapidly at the mouth is all the c-c-c-c-c links of the lipid are the same length, thus just varying the particular c-c-c-c-c length at phopsatidylcholine to get that particular version that melts at mouth temperature.

Now someone here is going to ask, "well, is it shiny?" I do not know, yet I think it can be made shiny with panning layers. panning is basically just rolling candy around until it gradually accumulates a coating. when you layer pieces of overhead projector plastic you get sufficient retroreflection to make a mirrorlike surface, thus I think you could use panning to produce retroreflective candy which would cause shininess.

beanangel, Jun 06 2012

Wikipedia describes lecithin http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lecithin
[beanangel, Jun 08 2012]

Slogans http://enchocolat.c...colate-bar-slogans/
[Phrontistery, Jun 09 2012]

[link]






       why does it need to be lecithin? any fat with the same melting properties could produce the same effect. Why not get the right fractions out of cocoa butter?   

       but in general, might be an interesting flavor effect/sensation
EdwinBakery, Jun 07 2012
  

       the problem with substituting lecithin and esp sucralose is that they are less hydrophobic than the wax and so would not protect the interior as well.
bungston, Jun 07 2012
  

       So the idea is to make flavoured fat with a sharp melting point?
MaxwellBuchanan, Jun 07 2012
  

       [bungston] I think you could coat the sudden melting point (lecithin with sucralose) on a layer of carnauba, to provide immediate taste sensation if the wax coating kept the nterior fresh or basically reduced hygroscopic effects. sucralose is 300 times sweeter than sugar so you only need a little at the surface with the lecithin.   

       The urge here is that when people taste candy, it tastes yummy immediately on contact, rather than like a neutral coating.   

       also phosphatidylcholine is a phospholipid, as an emulsifier that "shares" both hydrophilic as well as hydrophobic molecules it actively combines flavors, mobilizing them at a wet surface.
beanangel, Jun 08 2012
  

       I can see the ad campaign now... 'Mobilise flavours at 'your' wet surface'.
Phrontistery, Jun 09 2012
  

       [beanangel] I missed you! Just reading your desciptions make me realize that I haven't done any LSD in such a long time!! Thank you.
xandram, Jun 09 2012
  

       I'm going to award an 'encouragement bun' simply because there's nothing inherently faulty with this idea, regardless of how utterly useless it is. Keep up the solid science, [bean]!
Alterother, Jun 09 2012
  

       // So the idea is to make flavoured fat with a sharp melting point?//   

       If so, bun!   

       Mmmmm... flavoured fat.....
not_only_but_also, Jun 10 2012
  
      
[annotate]
  


 

back: main index

business  computer  culture  fashion  food  halfbakery  home  other  product  public  science  sport  vehicle