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Helium / Sulfur Hexafluoride Voice Changer In A Can

Take a puff and say something. Your voice goes from very high to very low.
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Sulfur hexafluoride makes your voice very low, helium very high. Inhaling both at the same time, they'd separate and the lighter helium would come out first and the heavier sulfur hexafluoride would come out last so your sentence would start out with a very high voice and end with a very low voice.

I believe you'd have to have two separate cans and nozzles to get even amounts of each gas in a single serving.

And I've never put an idea in "Other" before. I have no idea where you'd put this. Party favors?

doctorremulac3, Jun 15 2020

This guy DID IT RIGHT https://www.youtube...watch?v=k5m2kX7HEQ8
[doctorremulac3, May 22 2022]

[link]






       Product:Toy:Sound?
wjt, Jun 18 2020
  

       Makes sense.
doctorremulac3, Jun 18 2020
  

       [+]   

       Something about this idea mixed with a night at the opera appeals to me.
whatrock, May 21 2022
  

       Have any singers used this technique to extend their vocal range in performance or recording? I would like to hear this.
pocmloc, May 21 2022
  

       Not that I know of. Might be interesting.
doctorremulac3, May 21 2022
  

       Not one person's thought of using both and having the pitch change as suggested here? I find that hard to believe. They'd naturally separate in the lungs and create the described pitch transition effect.   

       Can't believe nobody's ever thought of this before but evidently nobody has. I've played around with both separately, never recorded anything and never both of them together but this seems like a no brainer.
doctorremulac3, May 21 2022
  

       Yea, the: AT THE SAME TIME!! link the guy doesn't do it right, the one I found, the guy did it so his voice started out high and got lower.   

       So this is even cooler now that it's proven to work but that this would provide the right sequence/mixture to have it do the high to low change every time.
doctorremulac3, May 22 2022
  

       You have to be careful with inhaling the heavier gasses - they're harder to breath out. You'd need warning signs on the can to protect yourself from lawsuits - and maybe that wouldn't even be enough.   

       Also, sulphur hexafluoride is a potent and persistent greenhouse gas, so we probably don't want to be encouraging frivolous uses.
Loris, May 22 2022
  

       True, what about nitrous oxide instead? Make it popular at parties.   

       And here's the warning sign I'd have on it: "DON'T DO THIS!", which is the warning sign on this idea as well.
doctorremulac3, May 22 2022
  

       CO2 is dense enough to change pitch; plenty of it around too. Not sure about the safety of mixing it with helium & inhaling... (I read somewhere a long time ago that "party balloon helium" also contains reasonable amounts of oxygen, specifically because of people inhaling it; a quick check of my local gas supplier says this is wrong (97% He, 3% air)).
neutrinos_shadow, May 22 2022
  

       Huh, you mean as a safety thing they made us goofy guys who use a helium activated Micky Mouse voice at parties to get the chicks a little safer by putting in some oxygen?   

       Well my faith in industry has just been restored. At least the helium filled party balloon industry.
doctorremulac3, May 22 2022
  
      
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