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exercise timer

The computer watches you do repetitive exercise, then counts for you, giving a green light when it is time to change activities.
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My perception of exercise is that with each new motion sometimes there is like a count to 20 or something like that.

Now if a computer were to notice the person exercising, then notice when 20 repetitions, or 20 seconds had passed, then gave a green light to cue the person, then the persons mind could be saying something other than "1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11, 12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20"

This could possibly permit new kinds of thoughts while exercising rather than "1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11, 12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20"

beanangel, Oct 25 2016

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[bigsleep, Nov 01 2016]

[link]






       When practicing yoga, one of the whole points is to also pay attention to your breathing, and the amount of breaths and/or duration of breath, should dictate how long or how short, you may intend to hold a certain pose.   

       It doesn't really have any set time, or such. It's all in the breath.
blissmiss, Oct 25 2016
  

       [+] change it up a bit : do the first 20 prime numbers, or recite the Greek alphabet backwards.
FlyingToaster, Oct 25 2016
  

       [blissmiss] is right about yoga. The idea goes better with just western style exercises ...so i changed the title!
beanangel, Oct 26 2016
  

       [beany] old bean, this is actually a complete box- tick of an idea. Coherent - yes. Grammatically acceptable - yes. Useful - yes. Feasible - perhaps (but I won't hold that against you).   

       It would need a moderate degree of image processing to notice the repetition, across a wide range of exercises, but it ought to be doable. Possibly even doable using a smartphone.   

       In fact, hang on a second. Why not just carry or wear the smartphone, and have it track accelerations? Probably easier (computationally), with the bonus that it wouldn't matter if you turned or moved over the course of several repeats.
MaxwellBuchanan, Oct 26 2016
  

       [mb] your thoughts go well with making this an iWatch app.
beanangel, Oct 26 2016
  

       Yes, that could work. Anyone here know how to write an app?
MaxwellBuchanan, Oct 26 2016
  

       Thank you beanie, I am all things yoga.
blissmiss, Oct 26 2016
  

       This idea does not involve explosives at all, so my bun is fairly reluctant.
Voice, Oct 27 2016
  

       //This idea does not involve explosives at all//   

       Not quite true. A smartphone would probably be capable of detecting violent movements. Therefore, it could also be used to monitor the number of successful suicide bombings you'd done.
MaxwellBuchanan, Oct 27 2016
  

       Better use a bombproof phone for that.
notexactly, Oct 27 2016
  

       Well, that's Samsung off the tender list, then ...   

       P.S. what [Voice] said.
8th of 7, Oct 27 2016
  

       //the Greek alphabet backwards//   

       That would be 24, not 20 - discounting the digamma... and the rough breathing, which probably ought to be included, given the context.   

       [+], by the way.
pertinax, Nov 01 2016
  

       //Yes, that could work. Anyone here know how to write an app?//   

       Yup, but unfortunately there are thousands of such apps already out there. [link]   

       I think I might have spotted a halfbakery common denominator, besides [bliss] who apparently does yoga if you can call that exercise. How can so many people be completely oblivious to fitness apps ?
bigsleep, Nov 01 2016
  

       You are correct. Yoga is not exercise. Yoga is a lifestyle.
blissmiss, Nov 01 2016
  
      
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